Master Mummers - Folk Drama II: More Old Nottinghamshire Survivals: Theories of Remote Pagan Origin (M.W.M. (1926b))

M.W.M. (1926b)


Source:

M. W. M. (Auth.)
FOLK DRAMA II: MORE OLD NOTTINGHAMSHIRE SURVIVALS: THEORIES OF REMOTE PAGAN ORIGIN
Nottingham Guardian, 11th Jan.1926, No.21775, p.6 a-b

Continuing M.W.M. (1926a), she quotes a description of plough trailing and malicious ploughing at a village near Clayworth, Notts. - probably Mattersey. The informant was aged 96, and also proffered an explanation of the origin of the Haxey Hood game. A female informant from an unnamed location mentioned how the Plough Monday actors used to "kidnap" the girls. Also, "the lads of South Wheatley used to go all around the neighbourhood dancing in cowhides, horns and all - scaring folks to death by peeping through the windows at night." Finally there is a brief foray into animal magic, broadsides, and records in the "Towne Book of Claworth".

[The clippings in Notts. County Library's Folklore box include two illustrations. These may have come from P.Herring (1926), and need checking against the original newspapers.]

Index Terms:

Locations: Mattersey, Notts. (SK6889); Haxey, Lincs. (SK7699); South Wheatley, Notts. (SK7685); Clayworth, Notts. (SK7288)
Years: Publ. 1926; Perf. mid 19th Century
Subjects: Play; Plough Trailing; Malicious Ploughing; Hood Game; Animal Disguise; Plough Monday; Kidnapping; Dancing
People: Miss M. W. Marshall (Auth.)
Archives: TDRG Archive, Ref. TD00076;
Notts. County Library, Local Studies Section, Folklore Box, L39.9

Last Updated Mar 1989 by Idwal Jones.